Pretty Vintage Cupcakes for Mother's Day!

recipe

Vintage Cupcakes

I didn't know what to say except well you name a chicken after me and it's quite likely that it is going to be just like me.

Vintage Cupcakes

Mr NQN also says that I take after my parents in some ways and sometimes my mother. The saying does go Like Mother like Daughter although my mother hand I have very different politics and personalities. She's conservative and religious, I'm more "live and let live" crossed with vague karma and agnostic ideals. But there are things that we both love. We both love ribbons, lace and pretty packaging so it was with her in mind that I attended a vintage cupcake class with Couture Cakes in Georges Hall.

Vintage Cupcakes

Couture Cakes is owned and run by Mary Armao and her husband and the business is run from their home. It was only six years ago that she was attending Planet Cake cake decorating classes. Bitten by the cake decorating bug Mary decided to start her own cake supplies store and hold classes on cake decorating. The classroom is small but we have all the space that we need and it's only the distraction of the well stocked shop just next to the classroom that we need to worry about.

Planet Cake: How to make a designer handbag

Planet Cake: How to make Alice in Wonderland Cupcakes

Vintage Cupcakes

"It became somewhat of an addiction for me and I started seeing cake designs and inspiration in everything! I started off working from home in a tiny little space making cakes for family and friends. As I grew I began getting new clients and expanding my portfolio and it wasn’t long before my workspace became way too small. I used to drive past this little shop every day that was for lease and I would always think, “Hmmmm… I wonder if I could…,” Mary explains.

Vintage Cupcakes

In today's class, Mary is going to show us how to decorate six vintage style cupcakes. Proof that the popularity of cupcakes still hasn't waned, this is her most popular class. It is also the perfect beginner's class as it teaches you basic techniques that you can apply to larger cakes or cookies and even though I decorate a lot, I find that also learn new techniques and about exciting new products to make cake decorating a bit easier.

Vintage Cupcakes

Mary

Mary shows us the six finished cupcakes. They're vanilla cupcakes decorated in pretty pastel pink and white with gold dust finishings and delicate touches. We crowd around and watch her decorate and then adjourn back to our own tables to complete the task using the tools provided. She starts with the antique rose as it needs longer time to dry and we switch between cupcakes in order to maximise the three hours which flies by when you're making cupcakes!

I'm sure even the inquisitive and curious Not Quite Lorraine would approve of them!

So tell me Dear Reader, is your taste the same as your mother's? Will you end up baking something for your mother this Mother's Day?

Psst! This week we will be holding a giveaway for some decorating sets from Couture Cakes so that you can decorate your own vintage cupcakes!

Vintage Cupcakes

Striped Bow Cupcakes

The striped bow cupcake is one of the easier cupcakes to make and requires two pieces of equipment. One of them is a brilliant idea that is new to me and those that have made multiple decorated cupcakes will love this. It's a foam dome that allows you to create the fondant shell ahead of time.

Vintage Cupcakes

Foam dome

Once you have your cupcakes, just choose the size of cutter you need. Too small and your cupcake will be exposed to air and will dry out and too large will look unsightly. Once you have the correct cutter you can roll out your white fondant - you want it a bit thicker so that it can take on the pattern of the striped rolling pin.

Vintage Cupcakes

Rolling the patterned rolling pin onto the fondant

Take the striped rolling pin and roll it firmly and deeply one way only. Use the cutter to cut out the circle and then gently lift onto the foam cupcake dome and smooth down all of the sides. Make sure that it sits in the centre of the dome. Allow it to set.

Vintage Cupcakes

The resulting pattern

Vintage Cupcakes

Gently shaping the disc onto the foam dome

Take a piping bag of buttercream, pipe some in the centre and once the fondant cupcake dome has set, gently place it on top of the cupcake. The buttercream will adhere it to the cupcake. It's always better to start with a little bit of buttercream and add more if you need it than to add too much.

Vintage Cupcakes

Piping the buttercream to adhere the dome to the cupcake

To make the bow, you can use a ribbon cutter that cuts out even strips. You can of course use a ruler and a knife but a ribbon cutter is easy for multiple cupcakes. Make the centre of the bow by cutting off a small length and then dabbing water at the sides and centre with the water pen. Fold the outside pieces to the centre and pinch the centre in to form a bow.

Vintage Cupcakes

Making the bow

Vintage Cupcakes

Gently squeezing the bow centre together

Then cut the strips of fondant in half horizontally and cut out two triangles as shown to make the ends of the bows. Fold this in half and adhere to the cupcake using the water pen and then affix the bow on top. Then using a little of the thicker bow stripe make the centre of the bow - folding over the sides makes it look more realistic and adhere this to the bow.

Vintage Cupcakes

Opening up the bow so that it looks more realistic

Finish with painting the stripes with gold. To make liquid gold, use gold colouring mixed with rose spirit rather than vodka as rose spirit has a higher percentage of alcohol so that it evaporates quicker and doesn't wet the fondant.

Vintage Cupcakes

Shaping the centre of the bow

Vintage Cupcakes

Overlapping the sides on the centre of the bow

Paint the raised stripes with liquid gold edible paint.

Vintage Cupcakes

Sparkling Chandelier Cupcakes

Vintage Cupcakes

This is another straightforward cupcake made possible by the use of silicon pattern mats. To use the mats, you simply dust it lightly with cornstarch and then shake it so that it is evenly but lightly dispersed in the crevices.

Vintage Cupcakes

Silicon mold

You don't want too much that the cornstarch appears in the cracks as it is hard to get out.

Vintage Cupcakes

Pink fondant rolled thicker to take on impression

Roll out the pink fondant, again fairly thickly as you want it to be able to take on the impression. You place the mat pattern side up and roll it away from you in one direction once. An impression should come out. I chose a chandelier pattern called "Virginia" for mine and I found that because it was so intricate I had difficulty rolling out all the detail but you can always start again using the same fondant re-rolling it.

Vintage Cupcakes

The pattern

Once the fondant has set a little and dried, take a silver shimmer powder and mix it with some rose spirit and using a brush, brush it gently at a horizontal angle so that only the raised parts of the pattern are coloured silver.

Vintage Cupcakes

Brushing the pattern lightly on the side with the edible silver paint

Lace Flower Cupcakes

This is one of the more difficult cupcakes because of the lace detail but once you get the hang on the process of making the lace, it's rewarding. Mary uses Dab paste (an instant icing paste) for this and the key is to have the dab paste as soft as possible to achieve this. Otherwise it won't work. To make the lace, you need a non stick mat, a silicon lace patterned mold, a palette knife and a small ball of soft dab paste warmed in your hand through kneading.

Vintage Cupcakes

Pushing the palette knife at an angle against the mold

Place the lace mold on the non stick mat (or it's even easier if someone helps by holding the lace mold down for you). Take the Dab paste and place it on the end and smoosh (that's a real term ;) ) the dab paste away from you using the palette knife held at an angle. You should have just enough dab paste in the mold to see the pattern as shown.

Vintage Cupcakes

The Dab paste filling the mold without any excess

Then gently prise it out of the mold millimetre by millimetre. You now have your lace! Slice it in half horizontally and using the water pen, place it on the cupcake. The water pen is another brilliant idea and replaces having a brush and a container of water handy to affix fondant.

Vintage Cupcakes

Slicing the lace in half to fit the cupcake

Vintage Cupcakes

Affixing the flower on top

Don't be discouraged with this. It takes practice to get this right and when you do, the results are beautiful. And you're only doing it right if your thumbs hurt ;) It's painstaking work and that is why Mary doesn't recommend doing this for large cakes.

Vintage Cupcakes

Two part flower press mold

The flowers are made using five petal flower cutters and Mary places these in a two part silicon mold press and presses gently. They pop out with lovely striations on them. Place them in a safe place to dry a little. Once the petals are firm, adhere them to the cupcake using the water pen.

Vintage Cupcakes

Flowers drying in cup shaped molds to help them keep shape

Pearl Cupcakes

Vintage Cupcakes

The pearl cupcakes can be done one of two ways. You can either roll out a small log of white fondant and then cut even pieces with a sharp paring knife. You then roll out each ball to make the pearls. This is time consuming obviously and if you're doing multiple pearl cupcakes, the quickest way is by using a silicon pearl mold.

Vintage Cupcakes

Cutting out pearl individually

Here you dust the mold lightly with cornstarch and then smoosh the white fondant into the mold. Using a sharp paring knife, trim any excess off and if there are any little bits, just rub them off the silicone with your fingers. Then bend the silicon mold to stretch and the pearls will pop out as a pearl necklace (perhaps in several parts).

Vintage Cupcakes

Or filling in the pearl mold with fondant

Vintage Cupcakes

Using a sharp knife to get rid of excess

Using a water pen, wet the top of the cupcake dome (shown in striped bow cupcakes) and then starting in the centre, gently place the pearl necklace on the cupcake. You'll need two lengths of the necklace mold per cupcake.

Vintage Cupcakes

The pearls coming out of the mold

Vintage Cupcakes

Using a water pen to lightly wet the cupcake dome

Vintage Cupcakes

Laying the string of pearls on the cupcake

Embroidery Cupcakes

This is one of the simplest but most effective decorating techniques. I remember when I first did it I was amazed at how effective and easy it was. I used a mold pattern to create my flowers but Mary shows us how to do this freehand.

Vintage Cupcakes

Painting "3" patterns

To make the embroidery pattern you need a small paintbrush, a little water and a bag of pink royal icing. Take a cupcake with a white fondant dome. Using the royal icing piping bag, pipe three number "3" to form a rough flower as shown-the threes all join together. Make them quite thick. Then lightly wetting the paintbrush, pull the royal icing into the centre of the flower and this will create the pretty drag marks. Repeat drawing five "3"s as shown and repeat. You can also draw leaves and partial flowers. The key is to not use too much water - I dabbed the brush in the water and then on my hand to absorb excess water.

Vintage Cupcakes

Royal icing edging

Around the edge you can use the royal icing to make a scalloped edge too. Once the royal icing has set you can colour it gold with a fine paintbrush using the liquid gold as detailed in the striped bow cupcakes.

Antique Rose Cupcakes

Vintage Cupcakes

I've left my favourite cucpake until the last and it is also the most time consuming too. Roses can be made by using a simple set of round cutters and a balling tool, foam mat, scissors, toothpick, styrofoam square and a bag of royal icing.

Vintage Cupcakes

Balling tools

Mary has already made the start of the antique rose for us. Resembling a cotton bud, it is a bud of white gum or petal paste shaped on the end of a toothpick. Gum or petal paste is faster to set than fondant although you can add CMC or tylose to fondant to create gum or petal paste. This is the only cupcake in which we'll use it.

Vintage Cupcakes

The start of the flower

Vintage Cupcakes

Rolling it around to make a bud

It is also harder to roll but you'll need to roll it out thinly. Mary advises using a pasta machine as it is the easiest to achieve the thin, even thickness. She rolls up and down rather than from side to side and once this is ready, she covers it with a double piece of vinyl to stop it drying out as it dries out quickly.

Vintage Cupcakes

Using a rolling tool to refine and thin the edges

She uses a set of cutters and uses a small round cutter to cut out one circle in the gum paste. She then uses the next size up cutter to cut out three circles. To give these a more realistic look, she uses a balling tool to smooth out and roll out the edges. You keep half of the balling tool on the circle and half on the non stick blue mat and roll back and forth pressing firmly but gently. Do this just on the top of the circle. The result is fluted petals on one side that resemble rose petals.

Vintage Cupcakes

Placing the first petal around the bud

She lightly wets the bottom of the petals and picks up the smallest single petal and sticks it to the toothpick. She wraps it around so that no white is showing and it creates the centre of the rose.

Vintage Cupcakes

Joining the rest of the petals

Vintage Cupcakes

Shaping the petals

She then takes the remaining three slightly larger petals and wraps one around the bud leaving on side loose. She then inserts the second petal in where it is loose and then pinches the first petal down gently but firmly. This is essential to make sure that the rose stays together. She completes the rest of the petals mirroring the process until she gets a small rose which she sticks into foam to allow to set.

Vintage Cupcakes

Using a toothpick to curl the top edge of the petal

Vintage Cupcakes

Curling the two edges over just like a rose petal

Then it's time to make the next rows of petals. Mary cuts out five circles and then frills the edges as before. To make the bigger petals you need a toothpick or piece of skewer and you roll the edges of the petal on the fluted side in two places as shown. With practice you may not need the skewer and you can just roll the petal with your fingers. Mary recommends doing this in front of the television as it is a repetitive task but one where you don't really need to concentrate.

Vintage Cupcakes

Attaching the petals

You then cut out seven even larger petals, fluting the circles and rolling the edges as above. You want these to dry in a container with circular depressions so that they get a rose petal shape. Allow these to dry.

Vintage Cupcakes

Then using the five size petals, wet them using the water pen and then using the same method above. You may not need all five petals, I only needed four. Allow to set on the foam. After about half an hour, adhere the seven larger petals onto the rose. Then once the rose petals are firmly affixed, take a white domed cupcake and place a little royal icing in the centre to stick the flower.

Vintage Cupcakes

Drying the petals in a tray

Carefully remove the toothpick from the rose -do this carefully and slowly. Then trim the bottom of the rose so that it can sit on the cupcake. If the petals start to droop, take the royal icing and use it as a glue. Royal icing sets quickly but you will need to put some scrunched up paper towel or tissue to help the petals keep the shape while the icing sets.

Vintage Cupcakes

Trimming the base of the rose

Vintage Cupcakes

NQN attended the class as a guest of Couture Cakes.

Couture Cakes

3 Haig Ave, Georges Hall NSW 2198
Phone:(02) 8764 3668
https://www.couturecakes.com.au/