L'aligot-not your ordinary mash

recipe

L’aligot-not just your ordinary mash

I got this recipe from Matthew Evans' The Weekend Cook which I received in a gift bag from Greenwood Plaza. I had actually mistaken him, and constantly mistake him for the other chef Peter Evans on Fresh TV. Matthew Evans is SMH's much feared food critic and we saw a little behind the scenes action on how the SMH Good Food Awards affect the restaurants on the ABC show -oops SBS show (thanks Jobe!) Heat in the Kitchen (unfortunately I missed 2 episodes so if anyone has these or knows where I can get them....).

L’aligot-not just your ordinary mash

I didn't know what to expect from his cookbook but flicking through it, I particularly liked the styling in it and the dishes and accessories-turns out they are not shop bought but rather from personal collections although I did recognise one Limoges cup and saucer set from the shops. Upon closer scrutiny, quite a few of the recipes appealed to me, the one for homemade crumpets I am saving until it gets a little colder and/or I have more time on my hands. This one was my other favourite, not only because my husband adores mashed potato but because I adore it too. As long as it's not Deb of course.

The L'aligot is incredibly rich, my husband who can normally wolf down a bowl of mash could only get halfway through his portion. Indeed, you could reduce the amount of cheese in this if it is too rich or just serve it as an elegant quenelle shaped portion next to a fabulous steak. If anything the method including the proportions of milk, butter and steamed garlic are perfect for making a buttery smooth mash so you could leave out the cheese altogether and just have it as the perfect smooth mash.

L'aligot

Serves 6

  • 1kg starchy potatoes, peeled
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 375ml (1 1/2 cups) milk
  • 150g butter
  • 300g provolone or other mild melting cheese, grated

Cooking time: 25 minutes

Step 1 - Steam the potato with the garlic cloves. When the potatoes are cooked as soft as goose down right through, mash them, with the garlic as finely as possible (I used my potato ricer with the finest sieve insert).

Step 2 - Put the milk in a large heavy based saucepan and bring to the boil. Vigorously beat in the potato a spoonful at a time with the butter. Turn down the heat and beat until potato is light and fluffy. You can use a hand mixer to do this if it's strong enough, or plop into the Kitchenaid.

Step 3 - Sprinkle in the cheese, beating the whole time. The mixture will take on a gloss and come away from the side of the pan as you beat it. It is then that it should be eaten or left ready to reheat and be eaten.

Step 4 - Serve with just steamed veg, or if you've got the constitution, with oven crisped duck confit, pan fried Toulouse sausage or some braised smoked ham hock. If there are any leftovers, they're best pan fried.

From The Weekend Cook by Matthew Evans

L’aligot-not just your ordinary mash