House Of Carbs - Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

travel

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

Please note that this story was written before the start of the COVID pandemic but the businesses featured are still in operation.

San Francisco's sourdough bread is famous-in fact there is a particular strain of bacteria said to be responsible for the signature sour flavour of San Francisco bread (named L. sanfranciscensis, no less) and San Franciscans love their bread with a fierce loyalty. Ironically Elisabeth Prueitt, co-owner of Tartine is a coeliac.

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

We arrive early one Sunday morning at Tartine Manufactory. It’s a square building in the middle of a light industrial area. The line has already formed outside with people waiting for a table (and the line will continue after we leave at 10am).

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

I watch a man take out loaves of risen dough from the metal shelves. He removes the flour coated sacks and the conveyor belt and then moves the dough into the Italian oven.

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

Slashing the loaves

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

The dough going into the oven

“That oven cost $100k but it also cost $80k in shipping,” he tells me as he notices me looking at their ovens. It allows them to increase the amount of sourdough production and they make 600 loaves a day here. You can also watch the bakers doing their thing from behind the glass walls.

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

It’s a light filled, airy spot with simple but tasty breakfasts. Adjacent to the eat in café there is a section where people can buy the bread and pastry to go. At 9am there is an already depleted display.

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

“Where are the morning buns?” I say out loud as I scan the display looking for their most famous pastry. “I heard them telling someone they were out,” says another customer to me, overhearing the conversation. Indeed they are.

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

Morning bun-less we take a seat at our table and our food arrives shortly later. Slices of country white sourdough come brushed with oil and lightly toasted-either plain or with za’atar. They bring this out with a pot of spiced quince jam that is gorgeously aromatic and not too sweet. We pair these with Bloody and Virgin Marys that are strong in celery salt.

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

Coddled eggs are served with a blanket of fresh chives. The yolks are gooey and I spread some onto my plain toast. Heaven.

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

Coddled Eggs $16USD

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

Smoked Salmon Tartine $15USD per serve

We are trying two types of tartines this morning and the first is a savoury one with smoked salmon, pickled onions, cream cheese and Meyer lemon zest. This is delicious, wholesome and simple.

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

Seasonal Tartine $12USD per serve

The other tartine is the fuyu persimmon tartine with almond butter, chopped roasted almonds, orange and a nice hit of anise from fresh tarragon. I love the use of persimmons on toast, a fruit I usually eat plain.

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

The pastries are next: there’s a chocolate babka pastry that has bitter chocolate. I think I’d like more sweetness or butter to this. While I really like the bread, the pastries are best taken home and then heated up.

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

Seasonal Fruit Muffin $5.25USD

The gluten free muffin is tasty and wholesome with almond flour, seasonal fruit and walnut crumble.

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

Seasonal Jam Bun $5USD

The jam topped custard brioche round is nice, sort of like a donut crossed with a brioche with the sugar sprinkle.

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

Savoury Scone $5.25USD

Out of the four pastries I like the cheese and chilli scone the best. It has pickled fresno chillies, white cheddar and chives.

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

Morning bun $4.25USD

As we get up to leave we hear the good news-they have morning buns! The morning buns are what Tartine is most famous for and has inspired a legion of copycats. I do remember them slightly differently. I remember a gooey-er bottom but I still feel like a victor having nabbed one of these.

So tell me Dear Reader, where is your favourite bakery in the world? And what is your favourite type of bread?

Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco

NQN was a guest of Tartine Manufactory and San Francisco Travel Association but all opinions remain her own.

Tartine Manufactory

595 Alabama St, San Francisco, CA 94110, United States

Open 7 days 8am–10pm

tartinemanufactory.com

Phone: +1 415-757-0007